13 August 2016

TMB launches Tripe Tomorrow campaign


TMB chairman Sir Norman Wrassle has joined forces with a former trade union general secretary to launch a funding platform to “re-energise” the UK tripe industry.

Sir Norman and Brendan Kean, formerly the General Secretary of the National Federation of Tripe Dressers, have set up Tripe Tomorrow to raise cash which will be distributed to “progressive” projects in areas such as policy development, digital media, campaigning and persuading people to consume more tripe.

Speaking at a launch event this lunchtime, the pair described the national turmoil which followed the EU referendum as the “greatest crisis in the history of tripe” and made clear their scepticism about Jeremy Corbyn by saying that the renewal of the tripe industry depends on backing those who support an austerity agenda.

"Under the Conservatives, we were promised austerity at least until 2020, which gave us a window of opportunity to promote tripe.  It is, as we have always said, the perfect austerity foodstuff," Mr Kean said.

Sir Norman said he was disturbed by reports that the Labour opposition could be about to reject austerity by re-electing Jeremy Corbyn as its leader.  "We'll be using the Tripe Tomorrow campaign to re-inforce the message that there's nothing wrong with a bit of harsh, unremitting austerity - particularly if it benefits the tripe industry," he said.

TMB Chairman hails Madeira trip "a huge success"

Tripe Marketing Board chairman Sir Norman Wrassle has described the TMB's recent fact-finding visit to Madeira as its most productive yet.

Tripe is plentiful in Madeira
In a report due to be sent to board members shortly, Sir Norman describes the island as a 'tripe-lover's paradise', pointing to the ready availability of the product in butchers' shops there.

Speaking earlier today, Sir Norman said: "I know a lot of people complain that it isn't always easy to find tripe in the UK - particularly if you don't have a branch of Morrisons in your neighbourhood.  I'm pleased to say that for British ex-pats or holidaymakers in Madeira, there's a ready supply of tripe always close at hand."

Sir Norman went on to say that the ready availability of flights to the island by low-cost operators such as Easyjet made the prospect of  people being able to travel there to stock up on tripe "eminently feasible".

"It's a six hour round trip from the south of England, which makes it a more reasonable proposition than - say - a trip up the motorway to Lancashire, particularly with traffic being what it is these days," he said.

Sir Norman said he would be opening up discussions with the Madeiran tourist authorities so that the island could become a 'destination of choice' for those seeking tripe and tripe-based dishes.